Courses

Subnavigation icon

Grade 9

Applying ICT 1 15F

This introductory course will teach students ways to organize and categorize information using outlines, graphic organizers, spreadsheets, tables, charts and file directories. Above all else, it will analyze perspective within the media. In essence, the intent of this course is to dig deeper into the tools used for electronic communication. For example, students will examine the ideas and messages behind blogs, podcasts, video conferences and instant messages. ICT courses reinforce and extend the knowledge, attitudes, and skills acquired by students in the Early and Middle Years in the areas of Information, Communication, and Technology (ICT). The courses will further prepare students to use ICT to learn and demonstrate their learning in all Senior Years courses.
Note: ICT115F and ICT215F are half-credit courses, offered in succession (9 weeks each) and students are auto-enrolled in both courses for the duration of the semester.
PREREQUISITE: none, but recommended for minimum grade 9 standing.

Applying ICT 2 15F

This course introduces students to presentation software, video projects, animation, and web design. Terms and ideas are explored to create student projects within Power Point, WeVideo, Stykz and Wix.

ICT courses reinforce and extend the knowledge, attitudes, and skills acquired by students in the Early and Middle Years in the areas of Information, Communication, and Technology (ICT). The courses will further prepare students to use ICT to learn and demonstrate their learning in all Senior Years courses.
Note: ICT115F and ICT215F are half-credit courses, offered in succession (9 weeks each) and students are auto-enrolled in both courses for the duration of the semester.
PREREQUISITE: none, but recommended for minimum grade 9 standing.

Canada in the Contemporary World 10F

CCW 10F is designed to help students gain a greater understanding of the society in which they live. They will explore the historical and current issues of citizenship and identity. They will gain an appreciation and understanding of “who is Canadian” while exploring the nature of our multicultural society. The political, economic and legal structures will be examined with a view to how each of these structures affects their lives. Students will develop their understanding and appreciation of democratic values, cultural diversity and citizenship within Canadian society while building their skills in critical thinking, negotiation, and consensus. Through the various topics and activities, students will have the opportunity to develop skills for active democratic citizenship. The four clusters of study include Diversity and Pluralism in Canada, Canada in the Global Context, Democracy and Governance in Canada, and Canada: Opportunities and Challenge.

PREREQUISITE – none, but recommended for minimum grade 9 standing.

Cree 11G

IN DEVELOPMENT – will not be ready for 2019-2020 school year.
This course will provide participants with the opportunity to develop and acquire the skills and knowledge to begin speaking the Cree language. Each student will be responsible for participating in a group setting and a one on one Instructional setting to acquire language skills and build on those skills by use of the BYKI program. Students will be expected to master time management and self-discipline by allocating certain hours to the course. Attention will be given to the instructional strategies, lessons/units and use of the BYKI Program.

English Language Arts (ELA) 10F

Grade 9 ELA 10F is a required foundations course. E10F provides students with a variety of experiences to explore and enhance their written and oral expression, critical reading levels, vocabulary and grammar development as well as an introductory study of literature that focuses on a more personal reader-response approach to activities. Students engage communication modes and literature in a variety of genres and mediums (short stories, poetry, drama, novels, news articles, speeches, etc. and consider proper use of grammar, punctuation, spelling, and vocabulary in all assignments.
PREREQUISITE – none, but recommended for minimum grade 9 standing.

Math 10F

M10F is a compulsory grade 9 course, designed to cover a number of different forms of mathematics, which will allow students to better understand the math that they encounter in everyday life. Also, mastery of the content of this course will prepare students to enter the mathematics stream of their choice.
Eight units are covered including: Number Sense & Rational Numbers, Powers & Exponents, Polynomials, Linear Relations, Similarity, Circle Geometry, Symmetry, and Statistics & Probability.
SPECIAL NOTE: It is during the M10F (Grade 9) course and upon completion that students will decide which mathematics pathway – Essentials or Introduction to Applied/Pre-Calculus – they will continue with in grade 10. It is highly recommended that students achieve a mark of 70% or greater before enrolling in the Introduction to Applied & Precalculus course in Grade 10.
PREREQUISITE – none, but must be at a minimum grade 9 standing.

Ojibwe 11G

Ojibwe 11G is a highly recommended First Nations language credit elective. Students are not required to be fluent speakers, as the course is intended for beginning speakers. Based on thematic units aligned with the seasons, students should be prepared to interact, converse, and utilize video / audio to capture their evidence of language acquisition in their assignments.
PREREQUISITE – none, but must be at a minimum grade 9 standing.

Science 10F

In S10F, students develop an awareness of the interrelationship of science, technology, environment, art, mathematics (STEAM) and society through the processes of scientific inquiry, technological problem solving, and decision making. The Grade 9 Science program is comprised of four units of study. Atoms and Elements discusses historical ideas and models, common elements, atomic structure, the periodic table, families of elements, chemical formulas and, physical and chemical changes. Reproduction discusses mitotic/meiotic cell division, asexual/sexual reproduction, the structure and function of male/female reproductive systems, single trait inheritance, dominant/recessive genes, and implications of biotechnology. Nature of Electricity discusses early models of electricity, electrostatic phenomena, current electricity, sources of electrical energy, electric circuits, and household electrical appliances. Exploring the Universe discusses locating visible celestial objects, historical perspectives, apparent motion, scientific / cultural perspectives on the origin of universe, major components of the universe, and Canadian participation in space research. Students are evaluated through a variety of projects, presentations, design of models, quizzes, unit tests, and labs.
PREREQUISITE – none, but must be at a minimum grade 9 standing.

Grade 10

Digital Film Making 25S

Students will develop their knowledge of technical production by exploring different design elements within the contexts of film and / or live performance. Lessons include preproduction, production filming, and post-production with specific activities culminating in a final project where students consider set design and construction, sound and lighting design, filming, editing, and mixing. EQUIPMENT / PERSONAL SUPPLIES – Students may supply and use their own digital camera or one can be loaned for a $50 returnable fee. Phone cameras not acceptable capture tools for this course.
Note: DP25S and DF25S are half-credit courses, offered in succession (9 weeks each) and students are auto-enrolled in both courses for the duration of the semester.
PREREQUISITE – none, recommended for a grade 10 standing.

Digital Pictures 25S

The purpose of the DP25S course is to provide students with the skills and knowledge to convey a message through an original image. Students will learn how to capture and manipulate a still image. Topics will include; Digital camera and how to use it, design elements, lighting, photo editing tools and picture manipulation. The course culminates in a final digital photo project A-Z. EQUIPMENT / PERSONAL SUPPLIES – Students may supply and use their own digital camera or one can be loaned for a $50 returnable fee. Phone cameras not acceptable capture tools for this course.
Note: DP25S and DF25S are half-credit courses, offered in succession (9 weeks each) and students are auto-enrolled in both courses for the duration of the semester.
PREREQUISITE – none, recommended for a grade 10 standing.

English Language Arts (ELA) 20F

E20F is a foundational course designed to increase students’ knowledge of reading, writing, listening, speaking, viewing, and representing. This course helps students become more skillful language users in a variety of task and assignments that emphasize purpose and audience. Students expand their knowledge of literary concepts as they continue to build their skills and knowledge of informal and formal essays.
Students study news and magazine articles, short stories, film, poetry, novels, plays, and complete projects throughout the semester, as they juxtapose personal views/reactions with larger perceptions and truths within the world. Grade 10 places importance on the proper use of grammar, punctuation, spelling, and vocabulary in all assignments.
PREREQUISITE – ELA 10F.

Essential Math 20S

This course is intended for students whose post-secondary planning does not include a focus on mathematics and science-related fields. During the course, students will cover a variety of topics including finance, measurements, geometry, and analysis of games and numbers. All topics have number sense embedded within them. This course emphasizes consumer applications, problem-solving, decision-making and spatial sense. A variety of assessment strategies will be used such as journals, portfolios, performance tasks, tests and quizzes. Required student tool: scientific calculator
PREREQUISITE – Math 10F.

Geographic Issues of the 21st Century 20F

The Grade 10 geography course offers an exciting and contemporary study of issues relevant to students and society. This course allows students the opportunity to see the interaction between the physical environment and human activities, in particular as it pertains to the environment and sustainable development. This course is organized into five major clusters: Geographic Literacy, Natural Resources, Food from the Land, Industry and Trade, and Urban Places. Identifying current issues, analyzing them and offering solutions make up a significant portion of the course. They study concepts related to ownership and development of natural resources, production and distribution of food, development of industry and trade, and increasing urbanization. Students consider these issues in the context of Canada, North America, and the world. Through their study, students become aware of the importance of the environment, stewardship, and sustainable development, as well as the social, political, and economic implications of their personal choices.

PREREQUISITE – Canada in the Contemporary World 10F

Introduction to Applied & Precalculus Math 20S

MAPC 20S is the Grade 10 curriculum available to students planning to pursue post-secondary studies in mathematics and science. This curriculum is particularly directed to students planning to enter science or the high-tech world of work. Topics include: Algebraic Reasoning and Manipulation, Measurement, Relations & Functions, and Data Management and Analysis.
NOTE: Students entering this course will require a proficiency in polynomials, exponents, algebraic manipulation and linear equations and relations from the Grade 9 program. Students taking this course should enjoy Math and be willing to practice new topics outside of class time. Algebra skills, numeracy, and reading and writing skills are important to the kinds of thinking and representing that are required in this course. Upon successful completion of this course, students may choose either Applied Math 30S and/or Pre-Calculus 30S.
PREREQUISITE – Math 10F with a recommended final standing of 70% min.

Life Work Planning 20S (Career Development)

LW20S is designed to help students uncover and develop their passions and desires. It will also help them discover what motivates and energizes them. They will take the first step in planning their future and acquiring the tools and skills needed in order to enter college, university, or the workplace. Students taking this course will find it helpful in career planning, enhancing their decision-making skills, improving their communication abilities and increasing their awareness of the world of work. Areas covered during the course include: developing abilities to help make and carry out educational, career and personal plans, assessing their own abilities, skills and interests related to the world of work, evaluating their personal work abilities, identifying occupational career clusters of interest, shortening their focus list of occupations, and understanding the impact their education has on career choices.
PREREQUISITE: none, but recommended for minimum grade 10 standing.
Must be able to access site: https://xello.world/en/

Print Communications 25S

In PC25S, students plan and develop their skills in creating documents for personal and business communications. Students will plan and produce various print documents, conforming to recognized standards and make business letters, labels and envelopes, meeting agendas, meeting minutes, research papers in a prescribed style, résumés, and cover letters. Students will participate in multi-user document editing and reviewing and use language and tone appropriate to the communication, while incorporating elements of good design when creating their documents. Any registrants of PC25S must have Microsoft Publisher installed on their computer (part of the Microsoft Office Suite) – no alternatives.
Note: PC25S and DP35S are half-credit courses, offered in succession (9 weeks each) and students are auto-enrolled in both courses for the duration of the semester.
PREREQUISITE – none, but recommended for a minimum grade 10 standing.

Science 20F

SC20F is a required course which prepares the student for further study in Biology, Chemistry, and Physics. The course covers the four major areas of science: biology, chemistry, physics, and the earth sciences. The units of study are (1) Chemistry in Action – prepares the student for the essentials needed to continue study in the science of Chemistry, where the unit focusses on the periodic table of elements and their properties. Students will learn how these elements combine to form compounds, how compounds interact with each other to form new compounds, balancing chemical equations and classifying reactions, and the properties of acids and bases. (2) Dynamics of Ecosystems – Prepares the student for the science of Biology/Ecology where the unit deals with the chemical and biological cycles in nature, specifically, the large-scale recycling of elements within the ecosystem, the effects of toxins on our environment, as well as population and dynamics. (3) In Motion – Prepares the student for the science of Physics, where students will study Newton’s Laws of Motion and how they relate to the movement of vehicles in traffic as well as the effects of sudden stops on passengers in these vehicles. Other areas covered will include velocity, acceleration, deceleration, speed, displacement and forces experienced in types of motion along with vector diagrams. (4) Weather Dynamics, where the unit that focuses on climate and dynamics of weather and the conditions that lead to the different weather events that are experienced worldwide. There will also be a focus on meteorological tools and their effectiveness in the prediction of weather.
PREREQUISITE – Science 10F.

Grade 11

Accounting 30S

Accounting is sometimes called “the language of business.” It involves identifying, measuring, recording, interpreting and communicating the results of business activities. It is used as a basis for controlling resources, determining profits, and measuring accomplishments. The purpose of accounting is to provide decision makers with useful information to assist them in making business and economic decisions. Decision making is carried out by individuals, businesses, communities, churches, and governments. Accounting education provides an awareness of a wide variety of accounting and technology careers, and lays the foundation for continued study and lifelong learning. Students will develop the ability to understand and use accounting information effectively. Computers in accounting offer an exciting way to perform mathematical and repetitive tasks, as well as the ability to quickly prepare accurate financial statements.

Active Healthy Lifestyles 30F (Physical Education / Health Education)

This compulsory full-credit course is designed to help youth take greater ownership of their own physical fitness, to encourage them to seek out activities that interest them, and to engage in active lifestyles into their futures. Students will study topics related to fitness management, mental health, substance use and abuse prevention, and the social impact of sport. The focus of this content will be on health and personal planning. As part of earning a credit for this course, students will be required to submit a personal fitness portfolio containing elements such as a fitness plan, physical activity log, or journal entries. Students will be assessed with a Complete (CO) or Incomplete (IN) designation as their final grade. The organization of the class will be outlined at the start of the semester, but is designated as a supported, blended delivery. To complete this course, students must complete the online modules and complete and submit 55 hours of moderate to vigorous exercise.

PREREQUISITE – Grade 10 Phys. Ed. 20F.

Biology 30S

Although there are no compulsory courses in Science in grade 11 (or 12), students are encouraged to pursue senior science courses in Chemistry, Biology, and/or Physics. B30S is an optional science course, intended as a first step for continuing study in Grade 12 Biology. The course aims to familiarize students with the fundamental aspects of modern biology. The goal of this course is to promote scientific literacy; not only possession of scientific knowledge, by effectively training students to analyze scientific problems critically. Students will study the human body divided into 8 units that discuss homeostasis, major systems of the body and aging. Students will explore technologies related to human health and medicine. Students will also gain an understanding of wellness and healthy living. Special Notes: This is a course for students interested in continuing the “Study of Life”. Biology would be of interest to students entering Physical Education, Recreation, and Nursing etc. at the post-secondary level.
PREREQUISITE – Grade 10 Science 20F.

Chemistry 30S

Grade 11 Chemistry is an optional science course and is a required or recommended course for many Science related programs at the university level like medicine, nursing, genetics, etc. This course builds on what was learned in the chemistry unit of Science 20F. The course focuses on theoretical and mathematical aspects of the interactions of matter. Students will also use experiments to further their understanding of the topics. Units include Physical Properties of Matter: explains how matter behaves during physical changes. Gases and the Atmosphere: explains how gases behave during temperature and pressure changes. Chemical Reactions: quantitatively explores chemical reactions. Solutions: deals with solubility and concentration. Organic Chemistry: deals with naming and reactions of organic molecules.
EQUIPMENT – The student will be required to have a scientific calculator.
PREREQUISITE – Grade 10 Science 20F.

Desktop Publishing 35S

DP25S is a half-credit course, offered following Print Communications 25S. The desktop publishing component of this course allows students to plan and create a variety of published documents. Students will learn about, plan and produce print documents conforming to recognized standards. Topics will include; layout and design, photos and artwork, and print media and culminate in a final project that incorporates the topics. Any registrants of DP35S must have Microsoft Publisher installed on their computer (part of the Microsoft Office Suite) – no alternatives.
Note: PC25S and DP35S are half-credit courses, offered in succession (9 weeks each) and students are auto-enrolled in both courses for the duration of the semester.
PREREQUISITE – none, but recommended for a minimum grade 10 standing.

English Language Arts (ELA): Comprehensive Focus Arts 30S

ECF30S course continues to deepen and widen students’ abilities to engage with a variety of literary and transactional texts. ECF30S helps prepare students for three English courses offered in Grade 12. Accordingly, students engage with and compose texts for both pragmatic and aesthetic purposes, allowing students opportunities to explore methods of communicating experiences and points of view.

PREREQUISITE – Grade 10 ELA 20F.

Essential Mathematics 30S

The Grade 11 Essential Math 30S course is intended for students whose post-secondary planning does not include a focus on mathematics and science related fields. Grade 11 Essential Mathematics builds on knowledge from the ME20S course and provides a foundation for the topics studied in grade 12 Essential Math. ME30S emphasizes consumer applications, problem solving, decision making and spatial sense. Students are expected to work both individually and in small groups on mathematical concepts and skills encountered in everyday life in a technological society. Topics include Interest and Credit, 3D Geometry, Statistics, Managing Money, Trigonometry, Relations and Patterns, and Design Modelling. NOTE: Essential Mathematics is accepted by MOST faculties at University, and Post-Secondary Institutions. Check with a counselor to ensure that Essential Mathematics is a viable option for your chosen career path.
PREREQUISITE – Grade 10 Essential Math 20S.

History of Canada 30F

HC30F is a required credit whose curriculum supports citizenship as a core concept and engages students in historical inquiry. Students focus on the history of Canada from pre-contact times to the present, with a view to understanding pivotal moments in our nation’s history. Through this process students will practice utilizing the following six historical thinking concepts:

• Historical Significance: How do we decide what is important to learn about the past?
• Evidence: How do we know what we know about the past?
• Continuity and Change: How can we make sense of the complex flows of history?
• Cause and Consequence: Why do events happen, and what are their impacts?
• Historical Perspectives: How can we better understand the people of the past?
• The Ethical Dimension: How can history help us to live in the present?
Guided by essential questions, students focus on the history of Canada from pre-contact times to the present. Through this process students think historically and acquire enduring understandings related to the following five clusters in Canadian history:
(1) First Nations, Métis, and Inuit Peoples, (2) French-English Duality, (3) Identity, Diversity, and Citizenship, (4) Governance and Economics, and (5) Canada and the World.
PREREQUISITE – Geographic Issues of the 21st Century 20F (G20F).

Interactive Websites 35S

The purpose of this course is to provide students with the skills and knowledge to design, develop and publish a website to display and gather information. Students should have the skills described in the learning outcomes for Web Design 35S prior to starting this course.

Physics 30S

Physics 30S is an optional course for students in the Senior Years and is designed for students with stronger math skills. Many topics deal with problem solving with mathematical formulas as well as theoretical explanations. The units include: Waves –includes sound and mechanical waves. The Nature of Light – deals with electromagnetic waves. Mechanics – further explores how and why objects move using graphs and equations. Fields – deals with gravitational, electric, and magnetic fields quantitatively and qualitatively. EQUIPMENT / PERSONAL SUPPLIES Students will be required to have a scientific calculator (cell phone calculators are not permitted).
SPECIAL NOTES – Physics 30S is a demanding course and requires a strong mathematical background. Physics is required for students who intend to enroll in the faculties of Engineering and Dentistry and is strongly recommended for entrance into the faculties of Computer Science and Medicine.
PREREQUISITE – Grade10 Science 20F with a recommended overall grade of 65% or higher. Introduction to Applied and Pre-Calculus Math 20S is recommended.

Precalculus Math 30S

MPC30S is highly theoretical and students who take this course should be skilled in algebraic computation. The main focus of this course is to prepare students for a future investigation of calculus. The pre-calculus stream meets all requirements for students pursuing mathematics, engineering and/or sciences at university. The course prepares students for a high level of theoretical mathematics with an emphasis on problem-solving, mental mathematics, as well as cumulative exercises and testing. Topics of study include Algebra and Number, Relations and Functions, and Trigonometry. NOTE: A mark of at least 65% in Pre-Calculus 30S is recommended to remain in the Pre-Calculus stream at the 40S level.

PREREQUISITE – Grade 10 Intro to Applied & Precalculus Math 20S – recommended mark of 70% with daily access to scientific calculator or TI-84 Plus graphing calculator (recommended).

Web Design 35S

The purpose of this course is to provide students with the skills and knowledge to design, develop, and publish a simple website. Students are strongly encouraged to register for Interactive Websites 35S in order to gain an additional half-credit.

Grade 12

Biology 40S

Although there are no compulsory courses in Science in grade 12, students are encouraged to pursue courses in Chemistry, Biology, and/or Physics. B40S is intended to give students a closer look at the study of genetics and biodiversity and is composed of the following five units: Understanding Biological Inheritance, Mechanisms of Inheritance, Evolutionary Theory and Biodiversity, Organizing Biodiversity, and Conservation of Biodiversity.
NOTE: After you graduate, you may wish to go to university, college, or become an apprentice, etc. Some programs that you may want to take have prerequisites. If you have not taken these particular credits in high school, they will not let you into the program. This means that some of the science courses that are chosen, or not, in grade 11 or 12 may have an effect on whether or not a student can take the program that they want after they graduate.
PREREQUISITE – Science 20F.

Chemistry 40S

Although there are no compulsory courses in Science in grade 12, students are encouraged to pursue courses in Chemistry, Biology, and/or Physics. C40S is an optional science course that is required or recommended for many science related programs at the post-secondary level like medicine, nursing, pharmacy, genetics, health sciences, etc. The C40S course is divided into six units: Reactions in Aqueous Solutions, Atomic Structure, Chemical Kinetics, Chemical Equilibrium, Acids and Bases, and Electrochemistry. These units form the basis of the student’s continued study that builds on their knowledge from earlier grades in science and chemistry. Throughout the course, students will gain an understanding of observation and inference in this experimental science.
PREREQUISITE – Science 20F.

Current Topics in First Nations, Métis and Inuit Studies 40S

CT40S examines Indigenous realities within contemporary and historic Canadian and global settings. The objective is to provide both students with knowledge of Indigenous cultures and traditions, and to encourage First Nation, Métis, and Inuit students to take pride in the accomplishment of their peoples. This knowledge will enable students to participate meaningfully as citizens of their cultural community, of contemporary Canadian society, and as active and engaged global citizens. Non-Indigenous students will become knowledgeable of the worldviews, histories, cultures, and accomplishments of First Nation, Métis, and Inuit peoples, and thus be able to engage in an informed and empathetic manned debates concerning issues at local, national, and global levels.
PREREQUISITE – none, but recommended for minimum grade 12 standing – mature content topics.

English Language Arts (ELA): Transactional Focus 40S

Students may require two grade 12 English credits as prerequisites of entry to some post-secondary institutions. The ETF40S course may be used as the second grade 12 English credit. Students enrolling into ETF40S should have a credit in ECOMF40S and have already written the provincial exam. In ETF40S, students will focus on practical applications of reading, writing and research skills, specifically targeted to students considering post-secondary education. The class readings will be diverse and come from varied sources that focus on media texts and other forms of non-fiction, rather than novels, plays, and poetry. The writing assignments will challenge students to write various practical styles and formats.
NOTE: All grade 12 students must take or have taken an ELA Provincial Standards Test (Exam). If this is your first ELA 40S course, there is a requirement to write the provincial standards test, worth 30% of the final grade. If students have previous credit in another ELA courses at the 40S level, such as Comprehensive Focus, students do not need to write again unless they wish to rewrite. In this case, an equivalent course based final exam will be substituted that does not have to follow the provincial standards. PREREQUISITE – credit attained in any of ELA 30S courses; Comprehensive Focus, Literary Focus, or Transactional Focus) and ECOMF 40S.

Global Issues 40S

In GI40S, students conduct inquiry into the social, political, environmental, and economic impact of contemporary and emerging global issues. Through their inquiry, focus is placed on questions with respect to the quality of life locally, nationally and globally. This course is based on the principles of active democratic citizenship, ecological literacy, critical media literacy, and ethical decision-making, and consolidates learning across the disciplines to empower students as agents of change for a sustainable and equitable future. As a mandatory component of the course, students plan and implement a community-based action-research project.
PREREQUISITE – History of Canada 30F.

Physics 40S

Grade 12 Physics is an optional science course. The prerequisite course is successful completion of Grade 11 Physics 30S. The Grade 12 Physics 40S is a required course for entry into careers in industry including Manitoba Hydro and Manitoba Telecom Systems (MTS). Further, it is a prerequisite for further study in physics at the post-secondary level. They Physics 40S course is divided into four units: Mechanics, Fields, Electricity and Medical Physics.

Precalculus Math 40S

MPC40S is a continuation of MPC30S and meets the requirements for further studies in mathematics, science and engineering at university and community colleges. The course is designed to give the student the necessary background in algebra, circular functions, and other non-algebraic functions such as exponential and logarithmic that are required to be successful in a calculus program. A strong background in algebra and analytic geometry is necessary for success in this course. Theory, proof and applications are stressed.
Topics include: transformations of functions, trigonometry, exponential and logarithmic functions, permutations and combinations. The Pre-Calculus Mathematics 40S course culminates with a provincial assessment worth 30% of the final grade.

PREREQUISITE – Grade 11 Precalculus Math 30S, recommended 65% minimum. Students who experience difficulty in mathematics would benefit from having this course scheduled beginning in the first semester.