Courses

Subnavigation icon

Grade 9

Applying ICT 1 15F

The purpose of this half-credit course is to reinforce and extend the ICT knowledge, attitudes, and skills acquired by students in the Early and Middle Years. The course will further prepare students to use ICT to learn and demonstrate their learning in all Senior Years courses.

Applying ICT 2 15F

The purpose of this half-credit course is to reinforce and extend the ICT knowledge, attitudes, and skills acquired by students in the Early and Middle Years. The course will further prepare students to use ICT to learn and demonstrate their learning in all Senior Years courses.

Cree 11G

This course will provide participants with the opportunity to develop and acquire the skills and knowledge to begin speaking the Cree language. Each student will be responsible for participating in a group setting and a one on one Instructional setting to acquire language skills and build on those skills by use of the BYKI program. Students will be expected to master time management and self-discipline by allocating certain hours to the course. Attention will be given to the instructional strategies, lessons/units and use of the BYKI Program.

English Language Arts (ELA) 10F

The English Language Arts enable each student to understand and appreciate language. Language proficiency generates confidence and competence in communicating in a variety of situations, as well as facilitating personal satisfaction and learning. Students become confident and competent users of all six language arts through many opportunities to listen, speak, read, write, view and represent in a variety of combinations and relevant contexts using a variety of texts. Grade 9 ELA 10F is a required foundations course.

Math 10F

Grade 9 Mathematics (10F) is a foundation course to prepare students for multiple possible pathways in Grades 10 to 12. The course builds on the understandings from Kindergarten to Grade 8 Mathematics. The learning outcomes are divided into four strands of Number; Patterns and Relations; Shape and Space; Statistics and Probability. For instructional purposes, the outcomes are arranged into eight units: Number Sense, Polynomials, Powers, Linear Relations, Statistics and Probability, Symmetry, Geometry and Circle Geometry.

Ojibwe 11G

This course will provide participants with the opportunity to develop and acquire the skills and knowledge to begin speaking the Ojibwe language. Each student will be responsible for participating in a group setting and a one on one Instructional setting to acquire language skills and build on those skills by use of the BYKI program. Students will be expected to master time management and self-discipline by allocating certain hours to the course. Attention will be given to the instructional strategies, lessons/units and use of the BYKI Program.

Science 10F

This course enables students to develop their understanding of basic concepts in biology, chemistry, earth and space science, and electricity, and to relate science to technology, society and the environment. Throughout the course, students will develop their skills in the processes of scientific investigation. Students will acquire an understanding of scientific theories and conduct investigations related to reproduction and heredity; atomic and molecular structures and the properties of elements and compounds; the study of the universe and its properties and components; and the principles of electricity.

Social Studies 10F

Grade 9 students will focus on the opportunities and challenges at the core of Canada’s contemporary plurality. They begin with an overview of Canada today, including its demographics, geography, and political organization. They examine the evolving stories of interaction among the people of Canada, and the influence of the land on the development of Canada. They explore the historical and contemporary complexities of citizenship and identity, considering the challenges and opportunities that emerge when groups with differing identities and perspectives interact with one another. Contemporary Canadian questions and issues are examined within the global context.

Students are given opportunities to explore how they may become involved in Canadian issues. Through this inquiry, they are enabled to become informed decision makers actively involved in their local, national, and global communities.

Grade 10

Career Development (Life / Work Planning) 20S

Courses in the career stream will help students acquire and apply knowledge and skills to make appropriate decisions for life, work, and the essential post-secondary education/training that is required in today’s economy. With career information and experience, students will acquire enhanced self-confidence, motivation, and self-knowledge and a greater sense of direction and responsibility.

Digital Film Making 25S

The purpose of the half- credit course is to provide students with the skills and knowledge to tell stories by combining sound, still images, moving images, text, graphics, and animation into a video product. Students will plan, develop, and produce a video project.This course is paired with WVC’s Digital Pictures 25S and is the second course in the semester.

Digital Pictures 25S

The purpose of this half- credit course is to provide students with the skills and knowledge to convey a message through an original digital image. This course is the first course in the semester and is paired with WVC course Digital Film Making 25S.

Prerequisite: Grade 10 student, recommended to have other ICT course(s).

English Language Arts (ELA) 20F

The English Language Arts enable each student to understand and appreciate language. Language proficiency generates confidence and competence in communicating in a variety of situations, as well as facilitating personal satisfaction and learning. Students become confident and competent users of all six language arts through many opportunities to listen, speak, read, write, view and represent in a variety of combinations and relevant contexts using a variety of texts. Grade 10 ELA 20F is a required foundations course.

Essential Math 20S

Grade 10 Essential Mathematics 20S is intended for students whose post secondary planning does not include a focus on mathematics and science-related fields. Grade 10 Essential Mathematics is a 1.0 credit course that emphasizes consumer applications, problem solving, decision making and spatial sense.

Geographic Issues of the 21st Century 20F

In Geographic Issues of the 21st Century, students focus on a variety of issues and challenges of the contemporary world. They explore the nature of geography and develop skills related to geographical thinking. Students use the methods and tools of geography, including geographic information systems (GIS) to examine issues and problems and to propose solutions. They study concepts related to ownership and development of natural resources, production and distribution of food, development of industry and trade, and increasing urbanization. Students consider these issues in the context of Canada, North America and the world. Through their study, students become aware of the importance of the environment, stewardship, and sustainable development, as well as the social, political and economic implications of their personal choices.

Introduction to Applied & Precalculus Math 20S

Grade 10 Introduction to Applied and Pre-Calculus Mathematics 20S is intended for students considering post-secondary studies that require a math pre-requisite. The topics studied form the foundation for topics to be studied in both Grade 11 Applied Mathematics and Grade 11 Pre-Calculus Mathematics. Components of the curriculum are both context driven and algebraic in nature. The learning outcomes are divided into three topics of Measurement, Algebra and Number and Relations and Functions. For instructional purposes, the outcomes are arranged into nine units of study: Graphs and Relations; Number Sense; Linear Measurement; Trigonometry; Relations and Functions; Polynomials; Coordinate Geometry; Surface Area and Volume and Systems of Equations.

Print Communications 25S

The purpose of the course is to provide students with the skills and knowledge to plan and create documents for personal and business communications. Students will plan and produce print documents conforming to recognized standards and make business letters, labels and envelopes, meeting agendas, meeting minutes, research papers in a prescribed style, resumés and cover letters. Students will participate in multi-user document editing and reviewing and use language and tone appropriate to the communication, while incorporating elements of good design when designing their documents. This course is paired with the WVC course Desktop Publishing 35S and is the first course in the semester

Science 20F

Science 20F is the final compulsory course for students in the Senior Years. Grade 10 Science consists of four thematic clusters: Dynamics of Ecosystems; Chemistry in Action; In Motion; Weather Dynamics. There is also a Skills and Attitude cluster. Further credit courses in science for Grade 11 and 12 students become optional and focus on specific science disciplines of Chemistry, Biology and Physics.

Grade 11

Accounting 30S

Accounting is sometimes called “the language of business.” It involves identifying, measuring, recording, interpreting and communicating the results of business activities. It is used as a basis for controlling resources, determining profits, and measuring accomplishments. The purpose of accounting is to provide decision makers with useful information to assist them in making business and economic decisions. Decision making is carried out by individuals, businesses, communities, churches, and governments. Accounting education provides an awareness of a wide variety of accounting and technology careers, and lays the foundation for continued study and lifelong learning. Students will develop the ability to understand and use accounting information effectively. Computers in accounting offer an exciting way to perform mathematical and repetitive tasks, as well as the ability to quickly prepare accurate financial statements.

Biology 30S

Grade 11 Biology is an optional science course. The prerequisite course is successful completion of Grade 10 Science 20F. The Grade 11 Biology 30S is intended as a first step for continuing study in Grade 12 Biology. The course is for students considering either entering an area of post-secondary study that require a science pre-requisite or other Grade 12 level course. The topics studied in the course are divided into 6 units including, Wellness and Homeostasis, Digestion and Nutrition, Transportation and Respiration, Excretion and Waste Management, Protection and Control, Wellness and Homeostatic Changes.

Chemistry 30S

Grade 11 Chemistry is driven by specific learning outcomes that can be arranged into five units of study including: Physical Properties of Matter, Gases and the Atmosphere, Chemical Reactions, Solutions and Organic Chemistry. These units form the basis of the student’s continued study that builds on their knowledge from earlier grades in science.

Desktop Publishing 35S

The purpose of the half- credit course is to provide students with the skills and knowledge to plan and create a variety of published print documents. This course is paired with Print Communications 25S on the WVC timetable and is the second half-credit course in the semester.

English Language Arts (ELA): Comprehensive Focus Arts 30S

In Grade 11 English Language Arts: Comprehensive Focus (hereafter referred to as the Comprehensive Focus), students develop a range of literacy skills that deepen their engagement with and appreciation of a variety of texts and help them function more effectively in their private sphere and in the global community. The language uses explored in the Comprehensive Focus fall along a continuum that includes both pragmatic and aesthetic uses. Students engage with and compose texts that inform, persuade, analyze, foster understanding and empathy, reflect culture, express feelings and experience, and bring enjoyment. They explore the aesthetic properties of language used in conveying experience, and the denotative properties used in communicating information and points of view.

The Comprehensive Focus addresses a variety of informal and formal discourse, ranging from oral discussions, free-writing, letters, improvised drama, and journals to reports, formal presentations, documentaries, short and book-length fiction, and poetry. These texts fall along the continuum of pragmatic, expressive, and aesthetic language uses, with approximately equal time being devoted to pragmatic and aesthetic texts. Texts such as instructions and handbooks use highly pragmatic language to accomplish purposes. Documentaries, travel articles, and creative non-fiction have pragmatic purposes but convey information or viewpoints through language that has an aesthetic effect. Poetry, short and book-length fiction, and plays use language primarily to capture and represent experience, feelings, or vision and to create an imagined reality.

The Comprehensive Focus provides opportunities to use, compare, and compose a range of pragmatic and aesthetic texts on the same topic or subject. Students may gather information or points of view from novels, memoirs, and dramas, as well as from newspaper articles, documentaries, and non-fiction books. Similarly, students may compose texts that use the aesthetic properties of language to accomplish pragmatic purposes. Advertisements, for example, frequently use poetic language, and narratives such as allegories may be written with the intention of shaping the attitudes or opinions of the audience.

History 30F

The Grade 11 History of Canada (30F) curriculum supports citizenship as a core concept and engages students in historical inquiry. Guided by Essential Questions, students focus on the history of Canada from pre-contact times to the present. Through this process students think historically and acquire Enduring Understandings related to the following five themes in Canadian history:

  1. First Nations, Métis, and Inuit Peoples
  2. French-English Duality
  3. Identity, Diversity, and Citizenship
  4. Governance and Economics
  5. Canada and the World

Historical Thinking Concepts and Skills, based on the work of Dr. Peter Seixas of the University of British Columbia, are embedded throughout the curriculum and provide a foundation for historical inquiry.

Physical Education / Health Education 30F

The Grade 11 Physical Education / Health Education 30F curriculum has been given the course title Active Healthy Lifestyles 30F. This course is designed to follow the 75% in class and 25% out of class recommendation by the province of Manitoba. It is a required Senior years course with pass / fail course final standings. It is composed of five modules titled: Physical Activity Practicum, Fitness Management, Mental-Emotional Health, Social Impact of Sport and Substance Use and Abuse Prevention.

Prerequisite: Grade 10 Physical Education 20F.

Physics 30S

Physics 30S is an optional course for students in the Senior Years. Grade 11 Physics is divided into eight units: Kinematics; Dynamics; Momentum and Energy; Waves; Force, Motion, Work, and Energy; Electrical, Gravitational, and Magnetic Fields; Waves and Modern Physics; and Nuclear Physics.

Precalculus Math 30S

Grade 11 Pre-Calculus Mathematics (30S) is designed for students who intend to study calculus and related mathematics as part of post-secondary education. It builds on the topics studied in Grade 10 Introduction to Applied and Pre-calculus Mathematics and provides background knowledge and skills for Grade 12 Pre-calculus Mathematics. The learning outcomes are divided into three topics: Algebra and Number; Trigonometry; Relations and Functions. For instructional purposes, the outcomes are arranged into eight units of study: Quadratic Equations, Radicals, Quadratic Functions, Sequences, Rationals, Trigonometry, Systems and Inequalities.

Web Design 35S

The purpose of this course is to provide students with the skills and knowledge to design, develop, and publish a simple website. Students are strongly encouraged to register for Interactive Websites 35S in order to gain an additional half-credit.

Websites 35S

The purpose of this course is to provide students with the skills and knowledge to design, develop and publish a website to display and gather information. Students should have the skills described in the learning outcomes for Web Design 35S prior to starting this course.

Grade 12

Biology 40S

Science courses beyond grade 10 are optional courses. Grade 12 Biology is intended to give students a closer look at the study of genetics and biodiversity. Grade 12 Biology is composed of the following five units: Understanding Biological Inheritance, Mechanisms of Inheritance, Evolutionary Theory and Biodiversity, Organizing Biodiversity and Conservation of Biodiversity.

Chemistry 40S

Grade 12 Chemistry is driven by specific learning outcomes that can be arranged into six units of study including: Reactions in Aqueous Solutions, Atomic Structure, Chemical Kinetics, Chemical Equilibrium, Acids and Bases and Electrochemistry. These units form the basis of the student’s continued study that builds on their knowledge from earlier grades in science and chemistry.

Current Topics in First Nations, Métis and Inuit Studies 40S

This course is designed as a multi-disciplinary course that allows students to explore and develop skills and concepts in the Arts, ELA, Geography, History, Social Studies and Law.

English Language Arts (ELA): Transactional Focus 40S

The specific student learning outcomes for Senior 4 English Language Arts: Transactional Focus reinforces and builds on the knowledge, skills and strategies, and attitudes developed in previous grades. The Transactional Focus assists students in becoming increasingly independent in making meaningful and effective language choices. In the Transactional Focus, students develop and refine a range of knowledge, skills and strategies, and attitudes that help them function effectively in various communities. The Transactional Focus emphasizes the pragmatic uses of language: language that informs, directs, persuades, analyzes, argues, and explains. In attaining the learning outcomes of the Transactional Focus, students engage with and compose texts primarily for pragmatic purposes: to gain information or discern another point of view, to compare and weigh ideas, and to conduct daily transactions. The Transactional Focus addresses a variety of informal and formal discourse, ranging from impromptu speech and instructions to debates and formal presentations; from exploratory group discussion to seminar participation and formal interviews; from note taking, data gathering, and representation to illustrated written instructions, case studies, and research reports.

Students’ engagement with texts is fundamental to the Transactional Focus. Texts are selected on the basis of purpose, with an emphasis on texts that use language primarily to convey information or viewpoints or to prompt an action from an audience. Some of these texts, such as non-fiction books, technical manuals, and handbooks, use pragmatic language, while others, such as documentaries, feature articles, and creative non-fiction, have pragmatic purposes but convey information or viewpoints through language that often has an aesthetic effect. Of the various texts students read in the Transactional Focus, approximately 70 percent are pragmatic and 30 percent are aesthetic in purpose. The texts students produce in the Transactional Focus are mainly pragmatic in purpose; however, students often use highly aesthetic language to compose texts, such as editorials, speeches, and advertisements that accomplish pragmatic purposes.

Global Issues 40S

Social studies examine human societies and the complex interactions of human beings living together in a shared world. This course provides a lens of ecological literacy through which students can study and understand the complex and often critical global issues that societies face today. Through this lens, students apply concepts related to sustainability, learn about the interdependence of environmental, social, political and economic systems, and develop competencies for thinking and acting as ecologically iterate citizens committed to social justice. The overall purpose of this study is not to instill fear in the next generation, nor to make students feel guilty for problems which are the cumulative legacy of many generations of mistakes, recklessness, and, in some cases, deliberate neglect or exploitation. Rather, the intent is to help students understand that human societies and institutions can and should be renewed, beginning with matters of personal lifestyle and extending through to collective, large – scale social change. The role of education in this change is vital, hence the importance of this course both as an instrument of critical understanding – seeking the truth – and as an instrument of hope – seeking to create a better future.

Physics 40S

Grade 12 Physics is an optional science course. The prerequisite course is successful completion of Grade 11 Physics 30S. The Grade 12 Physics 40S is a required course for entry into careers in industry including Manitoba Hydro and Manitoba Telecom Systems (MTS). Further, it is a prerequisite for further study in physics at the post-secondary level. They Physics 40S course is divided into four units: Mechanics, Fields, Electricity and Medical Physics.

Precalculus Math 40S

Grade 12 Pre-Calculus Mathematics (40S) is designed for students who intend to study calculus and related mathematics as part of post-secondary education. It builds on the topics studied in Grade 11 Pre-calculus Mathematics and provides background knowledge and skills for the study of calculus in post-secondary institutions. The course comprises a high-level study of theoretical mathematics with an emphasis on problem solving and mental mathematics. The topics include study of transformations of functions, trigonometric functions, exponential functions, logarithmic functions, polynomial functions, radical functions, rational functions and the binomial theorem.